Return to main page  

Return to Campaign 2004

 

Our Three (Senate) Amigos

(10/21/04 email sent to Club For Growth Members by CFG President Stephan Moore)

    As we write this, the presidential election and a half dozen Senate races appear headed to a photo finish.  Weíre working virtually 24/7 to make sure our candidates are victorious on November 2nd. I hope that you donít mind if we continue to update you on the very highest priority races.  These are the candidates who we think are shining stars AND are in desperate need of 11th hour donations because their races are so tight. The outcomes of these elections could decide which party controls the House and the Senate next year.  We certainly donít want to wake up on Nov. 3 to see Tom Daschle and Nancy Pelosi working hand in hand with a President Kerry. Today we will update you on our top priority Senate candidates.  Look for an email tomorrow about our top priority House candidates.

Top Senate Races

Tom Coburn, Oklahoma. 

Tom will be a warrior for fiscal restraint, and he will tie the Senate up in knots, if thatís what is needed, to stop the passage of a fiscally reckless spending bill.  That is precisely what Coburn did when he was in the House of Representatives.  More than anyone, he was the fiscal conscience of the House.  He received five ďAĒ grades from the National Taxpayers Union. He is also trustworthy, having kept his three-term limits pledge in the House. In a world where politicians talk too often out of both sides of their mouth, Tom Coburn is refreshingly frank. The two most recent polls have Tom up by three points and down by two points. He is running against Brad Carson -- a slick-talking, big-government-loving career politician who reminds us unfavorably of Bill Clinton.  Carson parades as a moderate, but sponsored legislation that proposed increasing spending by more than Senators Kerry, Kennedy, and Clinton combined.  If Carson gets in, it will be difficult to ever get rid of him -- he is a very savvy career politician.

Jim DeMint, South Carolina

 Jim is one of the most free-market and principled men in Congress.  Columnist George Will was exactly right when he wrote that if DeMint wins ďthe Senate will acquire a distinctive voice.Ē  He has been a leading advocate of the key economic growth issues of our time, and has a rock solid voting record, earning ďAĒ grades from the National Taxpayers Union four times.  His liberal opponent, Inez Tenenbaum, has been plastering Jim for his support of replacing the income tax with a fair and simple tax system.  Her TV ads are a complete distortion of his position.  What a surprise . . . liberal lies against a free-market champion. Tenenbaum favors retaining the dreadful Death Tax.  In her post as State Superintendent of Education, she supported massive statewide tax hikes and opposed school choice.  With all her backing from lawyers, itís no surprise she opposes tort reform, too.  The latest poll shows Jimís lead at just three points.

Pete Coors, Colorado

The former CEO of Coors Brewing Company solidly supports free markets, lower taxes, and smaller government.  We love the fact that Pete Coors would bring much-needed perspective to the Senate from someone who has spent years in the private sector creating jobs, meeting a payroll, and delivering profits for investors. While some Republican candidates know the economic theory, he has the experience of dealing with complicated tax laws and regulations and the stifling effects these burdens create on the free market system. The polls have this race very tight.  The Democrats have nominated a popular Hispanic state attorney general, Ken Salazar.  He wants to repeal the Bush tax cuts, renew the death tax, and prevent meaningful tort reform.  The latest polls show this race as a toss up.

 

(The Club For Growth suggests all donations go to these candidates. I'd take their word for it. They call it how it is. Visit www.clubforgrowth.org for more info on the Club For Growth. Donations can given via the CFG or the candidates websites.)

 

Return to Campaign 2004

Return to main page